Sliotars Dating back to the 12th Century

sliotar

These Sliotars above are from a new exhibit Hair hurling balls: Earliest artefacts of our national game, at  National Museum of Ireland – Country Life in Castlebar. The earliest was made in the second half of the twelfth century.

The balls are made from matted cow hair with a plaited horsehair covering.  The National Museum of Ireland claim there is a link between the name ‘sliotar’ and the Irish word ‘liotar’, meaning ‘hair’.

sliotar2

Via Meath Chronicle and Nótaí Imill

Typeface: The Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum

Typeface is a documentary film, produced by Kartemquin Films, focusing on a rural Midwestern museum (the Hamilton Wood Type and Printing Museum in Two Rivers, Wisconsin) and print shop where international artists meet retired craftsmen and together navigate the convergence of modern design and traditional technique.

 

Sculpting with Bees and 3D Printing

I’ve posted before about Hilary Berseth’s sculptures which he makes by placing armatures into bee hives but the 3B Printing Project takes this a step further by using 3B printed moulds. It’s an ad for honey but worth a look anyway. The first minute of the video is about beekeeping, the sculpture part starts after that.


via Make

 

Woven Silver Cone from 10th Century Dublin

There are three separate strands of silver, each composed of between 15 and 18 wires. Yet, Halpin says, it is very hard to find where all these wires end. The visual effect is that of a single thread turning endlessly around itself. There are traces of some kind of organic material inside the cone, probably a wax shape around which the wires were woven. The visual imagination and the physical deftness required to do so are of the highest order.

This artefact is housed in the National Museum of Ireland and the text and image above come from the Irish Times’ History of Ireland in 100 objects