Approaching the Landscape in The Irish Times

Niall de Buitléar’s small paintings, built from intricate concentric patterns, are geometric but also suggestive of organic processes. They equate to the world outside: complex and orderly but also contingent and unpredictable. Their handmade precision makes them visually fascinating. You could quite happily live with any one of them and never tire of it.

From Aidan Dunne’s review of Approaching the Landscape at Rua Red in the Irish Times

 

Miriam Meets Alice Maher and Dermot Seymour

In a fantastic interview from RTE Radio 1 Miriam O’Callaghan interviews Irish artists Alice Maher and Dermot Seymour about their work and their life together

1. Listen Here:     

Direct link to

2. mp3     

Woven Silver Cone from 10th Century Dublin

There are three separate strands of silver, each composed of between 15 and 18 wires. Yet, Halpin says, it is very hard to find where all these wires end. The visual effect is that of a single thread turning endlessly around itself. There are traces of some kind of organic material inside the cone, probably a wax shape around which the wires were woven. The visual imagination and the physical deftness required to do so are of the highest order.

This artefact is housed in the National Museum of Ireland and the text and image above come from the Irish Times’ History of Ireland in 100 objects

Michael Warren Podcast

Michael Warren was interviewed for RTE Radio One’s Arts Tonight programme about his exhibition Broken Line at Visual in Carlow. Here is a link to an mp3  of the

1. interview     
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The exhibition is now closed.

Guillermo Kuitca

I’ve mentioned Guillermo Kuitca a number of times on this blog before and here are a couple of videos I’ve come across today. The first is Kuitca’s piece Stage Fright which is described on Youtube as “animation for Kuitca’s Show at Gallery Met at the Metropolitan Opera House, New York. 2007″. The piece relates to the artist’s series of “drawings” involving inkjet prints of coloured theatre seating plans being dipped in water of varying temperatures.  The second is the first of a three part conversation between Kuitca and the curator Douglas Dreishpoon Albright at Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo NY. The other two parts can be found on this youtube profile.

The Dustbin of Art History

Here is an article by Ben Lewis from Prospect Magazine which draws a comparison between trends in contemporary art and mannerist art of the past which were celebrated in their time but which are no longer as highly valued. Below is an excerpt:

There is a pattern typical of these end-phase periods, when an artistic movement ossifies. At such times there is exaggeration and multiplication instead of development. A once new armoury of artistic concepts, processes, techniques and themes becomes an archive of formulae, quotations or paraphrasings, ultimately assuming the mode of self-parody.

Over the last decade, not only conceptualism—perhaps the dominant movement of the past three decades—but the entire modernist project has been going through a similar process.

I believe that this decline shares four aesthetic and ideological characteristics with the end-phases of previous grand styles: formulae for the creation of art; a narcissistic, self-reinforcing cult that elevates art and the artist over actual subjects and ideas; the return of sentiment; and the alibi of cynicism.”

Image: Jeff Koons, Balloon Dog, Stainless steel with transparent color coating installed at The Palace of Versailles